Tag: pork

Guo Tie- Potstickers

Now that I’ve gotten over my brief infatuation of gardening (the honeymoon phase is over; weeds galore have dampened my enthusiasm a little 🙁 ), I will be sitting down at the computer to write more. Thanks, reader MLee for leaving me a kind comment that reminds me why I started this blog in the first place 🙂

As I might have said before in the dumplings post and have been learning, you use hot water dough for foods like steamed dumplings, (zheng jiao) potstickers(guo tie) or chive boxes (jiu cai he zi) to make the dough nice and tender for crisping up. The hot water kills some of the gluten formation. For chewy stuff like noodles or boiled dumplings, use cold water for a chewier, stretchier dough.

Did you know that you can make these with whole wheat flour and they can still taste good,  and in my opinion, even tastier? What’s even better is that the dough is nutritious and also more filling than if you were to use all-purpose flour, thanks to the fiber. Whole wheat also makes foods more jie shi (結實), or solid/sturdy/filling. I won’t be going back to all-purpose anytime soon. Read past the recipe for my favorite aspects of whole wheat flour, but first, the recipe and some pictures. Continue reading

Jiu cai hua rou si- Flowering Chinese chives with pork

If there’s one seasoning/herb I could never grow sick of, it’s garlic. I once was afraid that if I ate too much garlic, I’d get tired of it. After 27 years, I’m still going garlic-strong, so I don’t think my love for this stinky bulb will go away anytime soon. Fortunately, Mr. ABC Chef shares the same love for garlic…

Garlic chives, Chinese chives, or jiu cai 韭菜 are one of my favorite spring/summer time vegetables to eat, because to me it is basically like eating garlic in vegetable form… They are great in dumplings, wrapped in dough, or just cooked with eggs. What’s jiu cai hua, then(韭菜花)? It’s actually the bolted form / flowered form of the garlic chive. I have no idea why, but I guess when the jiu cai flowers, the stem also gets crunchy, so the texture is different than jiu cai! So cool, huh?! I thought they were originally two very very closely related plants because the textures were  different, but after I got a fresh delivery of homegrown jiu cai from Ling (thanks Ling!!). What my dad said was about the flowering was confirmed when I saw some jiu cai hua poking out amidst the oodles of jiu cai!

jiu cai hua rou si Chinese chive flowers flowering Continue reading

Taiwan Eats I of V: Taipei Part 1

I’ll be sharing about some of my food experiences in Taiwan in this 5 part series. It will mostly reflect our most recent trip (Oct 25- Nov 8), but will also talk about some places I went to on my second trip by myself, back in 2011. I didn’t capture all of the places we went to, but I did my best! We spent time in Taipei, Gaohsiung, Hualien, Yilan, then back to Taipei. I’ll post in order of where we went.

Don’t worry- recipes will still be posted!

If you are traveling to Taiwan with USD, you will feel rich. Note that T and I prefer mom and pop, no frills places, with some exceptions for fancier places. Taiwan is like a culinary mecca, so I know there are thousands of restaurants and food stands we missed. It would probably take a lifetime to explore them all, and have enough stomach to try everything! Do you have a favorite place to eat in Taiwan?

阜杭豆漿 fu hang dou jiang
Hua Shan Market, 2F
台灣台北市忠孝東路1段108號2樓
(02) 2392-2175

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Liang Mian (Taiwanese Cold Noodles)

When I was growing up in the great state of California, our house never had air conditioning. Despite the shade that the humongous avocado tree in the backyard provided for the house, summer would be very, very hot.

I remember many hot nights of sleeping next to my sister on the large area rug under the dining table, in the one room that had a window air conditioning unit. It was also common to see my dad walking around the house without a shirt! (Is there a more economical way to cool oneself, anyway?)

As a remedy for these hot summer days, my mom would make liang2mian4, also known as 涼麵 or cold noodles, for dinner. Whereas we would rinse the noodles with cold water to speed up the cooling process, my mom’s job as a kid, assigned by her grandmother, would be to cool the noodles by fanning them!

If my mom’s job as a kid on 涼麵 days was to fan the noodles, my job was to make the sesame paste sauce.  My mom would hand me the jar of zhi1ma2jiang4 (not to be confused with the game, mahjong) so I could scoop some into a bowl, asking “more?” until she said that it was enough. I learned how to adjust the ratio of sesame paste to water, adding more of one or the other until I got a nice consistency of ‘paste’: not too thin, not too thick.

I knew I wanted to make cold noodles because of the warm weather, and I knew that I had leftovers of romaine lettuce, red cabbage, and carrots from previous cooking days. The first thought that came to mind was the question of authenticity. I’m sure they don’t use cabbage and romaine in Taiwan. I remember romaine in cold noodles from Silk Road Express, a Chinese cafe on JHU’s campus! But other than that, I had never eaten it in cold noodles; after all, I’m quite sure romaine lettuce is not a frequently eaten vegetable in Taiwan.

I’ve been thinking about “authenticity” lately. I remember that we would more often than not, eat spaghetti noodles in our liang2mian4. Why? It
happened to be the noodles that we had in the house. Then I thought, if my mom used spaghetti, I should be able to use nontraditional vegetables if that’s all I got. Apparently, my mom was open to using substitutes in order to feed her ravenous husband and children without another trip to a store. Sounds logical, right? These is a place and time for substitutions, I have come to realize more and more.

Although my favorite cold noodles are still my mom’s version, I enjoyed today’s as well (so did Tim!). I’ll provide both versions. In my family, liang2mian4 was DIY, and I would encourage you to do the same.
Ingredients Spotlight:

Yep! Just sesame seeds.

I can tell you that sesame paste and tahini are very different, both in color and taste. My research tells me that Chinese-style sesame paste is made from unhulled sesame seeds, whereas tahini is made from hulled sesame seeds. The difference in color seems consistent with that claim. The sesame paste shown above is made from white sesame seeds and should not be confused with sesame paste made from black sesame seeds (used in Chinese desserts).

Chinese Cold Noodles liang mian

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