Tag: how to make

Chao Mi Fen

The more I record my steps to make recipes for this blog, the more I realize that it is so difficult to make exact recipes for dishes! There are so many variables in cooking- how powerful is your stove? How thick are your ‘julienned’ carrots? How big is one dried shiitake mushroom versus another? What type of salt? Even just for kosher salt, Diamond brand versus Morton brand have different sized flakes of salt- Morton brand is noticeably saltier per pinch of salt (try it!). Some soy sauces are super salty (cough Kikkoman red), and others are not as salty (Pearl River Bridge, for instance). I aim to provide as good of instructions as possible, but there are some variables I can’t account for. That being said, please use the recipes I post, but also use your tastebuds and intuition to guide you, even if that means straying from the exact amounts and such!

chao mi fen

Stir-fried Thin Rice
Vermicelli

炒米粉

chao mi fen (tsao mi fen)

help from: YTower and 李梅仙老師

Makes 4 hearty “carb” servings

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Garlic Chive Pockets / Chinese Leek Boxes

This is for you, Jen Fung!

My grandma tells me to eat napa cabbage in the winter, and garlic chives, or jiu cai, in the summer. This applies largely to dumplings, because two of the most common fillings are some variation on pork and napa or pork and garlic chives.

Tim and I were in Chinatown getting groceries and these chives were so fat and plump! I knew they would be good. They call them garlic chives because they smell and taste so strongly of garlic that one would think there is garlic in the dish as well.

Today, I will teach you how to make jiu cai he zi ( 韭菜盒子), or literally, Garlic Chive Boxes. Chive pockets, for some reason, sounds more right to me. Maybe because of its association with hot pockets? Anyway, I toiled long and hard on this recipe…I made the dough 5 times before I was happy with it! I have lots of experiences with cold water dough, but the hot water dough was a new technique for me to learn.

These goodies are made with hot water dough, which also can be used to make scallion pancakes, potstickers, 小龍包 (xiaolongbao), or soup dumplings, and many other goodies.

I would eat jiucaihezi a bowl of xi fan or soup for dinner, or just as is for lunch or breakfast 🙂 Enjoy!

I found my pictures! Yay! If you have the patience for it, you can follow along in the linked video to learn how to roll out the dough. Even if you can’t understand her, the visuals definitely at least helped me!

She uses a lot more water, but I’m not sure why, because her measurements gave me very goopy dough many times! Follow my water suggestions for success 🙂


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